Home-funeral guides believe that families can benefit from tending to — and spending time with — the bodies of their deceased. Burke Denman at home in Santa Fe after his death in 2016. He was buried in a natural grave in New Mexico.Credit…Lyra Butler-Denman Heidi Boucher loaded two big straw baskets into her Toyota Highlander. She always kept them packed, ready for death. Inside were a pair of leather work gloves and a hammer, a bunch of bed pads, a few adult diapers (dead bodies sometimes leak), Q-tips for cleaning ears, noses and mouths and for applying lipstick, cotton balls, disinfectant spray, a plastic zip bag of safety pins to help drape silk and other fabrics around a gurney or casket, a small screwdriver to tightly close a casket, latex gloves, a hairbrush and oils infused with rose, lavender and rosemary. Boucher also had her black attaché case of paperwork on funeral planning, which included a few funeral-home price lists for cremation and other services, as well as the files of 20 or so clients who had already made plans for Boucher to help with their bodies after death. Among them was Susan L’Heureux, a 79-year-old wife, mother, grandmother, reading teacher at...