Johns Hopkins University sit-in escalates with direct action and full occupation

Nearly a month after Johns Hopkins University students and Baltimore residents began their sit-in on campus in protest of the school’s contracts with Immigrant and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and the formation of JHU’s own private police force, organizers raised the stakes. Yesterday at 4 p.m., eight students chained themselves to to the stairs inside Garland Hall, the administrative building they have been occupying since April 3. “This is an important announcement: We the students of the sit-in are fully occupying the building and frankly ask you to leave. You’re welcome to stay if you wish to support us,” a student declared from the second floor. “We have escalated today to having people chaining themselves to stairwells,” Adela Chelminski said. “We are going to stay here until we get negotiations with the administration and what we are calling for is still no private police, the end of the ICE contracts between Hopkins and ICE, and justice for Tyrone West.” The stark administrative building—all big tall windows and a Panopticon-like design inside—is now covered with signs and quotes from activists turning it into a more casual and much more radical space. “People are doing so...

The increased tariffs enacted by the U.S. on products coming from China raise the costs for

The increased tariffs enacted by the U.S. on products coming from China raise the costs for many American companies and threaten their future profits. On Friday, the U.S. raised import tariffs to 25% on $200 billion of Chinese goods, such as circuit boards, microprocessors, vehicle parts and machinery. President Trump also has warned about imposing 25% tariffs on $325 billion in Chinese goods that aren’t currently taxed. Such a move would cover virtually all Chinese exports to the U.S. and spread the pain to consumers. Consumers haven’t felt the brunt of the U.S.-China trade fight since the tariffs so far have largely targeted components used by manufacturers or because businesses absorbed some of the initial 10% tariffs. The tariff increase will cover a range of auto-parts imports, from spark plugs to exhaust pipes, and likely cascade through the supply chain, potentially affecting prices on new and used cars, industry experts said. While the 10% tariff levied in September had little effect on parts pricing, auto-sector lobbyists said an increase to 25% could push up makers’ costs for cars assembled in the U.S. using imported parts. The higher duty also could increase prices f...