The student, from India, plans to get a job at a pork processing plant, then earn

The student, from India, plans to get a job at a pork processing plant, then earn a job in quality control at a food processor and finally, get a position with the federal government. “The long-term goal is to work for the CFIA (Canadian Food Inspection Agency) and become a food inspector,” said Kaur, while surrounded by several of her classmates at Assiniboine Community College (ACC) in Brandon. Kaur and her fellow students are taking an 11-month certificate program in food processing at ACC, specializing in meat cutting and meat processing. The students, mostly from India and China, began the course in May 2019 and will complete the program this spring. Of the 38 students in the program, about 15 participated in the grand opening of the Food Processing Centre for Animal Proteins, held Jan. 22 at the ACC campus. A list of funders, including the federal and provincial governments, Maple Leaf Foods, Hylife Foods, Manitoba Pork, the United Food and Commercial Workers union and the Brandon Hog and Livestock Show, contributed $1.165 million to help build the centre. “I’m thrilled to be in a facility like this and see the potential here,” said Manitoba agriculture minister Blaine Pe...

Air Canada Passenger Left Alone On Cold Dark Plane : NPR

An Air Canada jet at Toronto Pearson International Airport in Toronto. Daniel Slim/AFP/Getty Images hide caption Ever had a nightmare in which you wake up at night, alone, strapped in a seat in a completely dark and freezing cold room with no means to contact anyone? That’s the story Air Canada passenger Tiffani Adams told about what was supposed to be a simple 90-minute flight from Quebec City to Toronto Pearson International Airport earlier this month. Adams, who has since been experiencing anxiety and insomnia, wrote that she fell asleep in a row of seats on a nearly empty flight, and by the time she woke up the plane had arrived at its destination and had been parked away from the nearest terminal. Her cellphone battery was depleted, therefore useless, and there was no power on the plane to recharge it. Adams made her way to the cockpit, where she eventually found a flashlight. The light helped her figure out how to open the main exit door. But there was no gangway, so she was staring at what she said was a 40 to 50 foot drop to the ground, hardly an attractive means of escape. She focused the flashlight on the plane’s exterior, hoping that the reflection might ...